East Coast Tour – Scarboro’, Whitby, Staithes, Robin Hood’s Bay

26 05 2019

Early March
As mentioned in my Hole of Horcum post, Richard and I had been gifted a free night away and had extended it to a 3-day trip to the East Coast and the North York Moors. This is a general, mainly photos post featuring the main locations…

Photos a mix of my film and Richard’s digi photos (marked)

The evening we arrived, we took a quick trip to Scarborough as it was only six miles from our hotel. We parked at South Beach which was free in the evenings. This is the tourist end of Scarborough though – a land of slot-machine arcades, candy floss and so on… So, after a quick walk on the beach we headed off, via the Castle on its lofty ridge separating the bays, to North Beach. I did get Richard to buy me a bag of freshly-made ring doughnuts though as I haven’t had any for years! 😉


The moon is actually over the towers in this photo but my camera didn’t really pick it up!

Richard wanted to visit a particular pub for their real ale and, by the time we came out, it was getting pretty dark. All we managed was a walk on the clifftop above North Beach and back to the car before dark…

The next day was our ill-fated trip to see my brother in Whitby – he adamantly refused to see us! Still, we love Whitby so we spent a few hours exploring and had been lucky to find some free parking (after paying a couple of quid to try to visit my brother). Of course, the first thing I had to do was have a paddle – well you’ve got to haven’t you? 😉


Richard’s photos obviously

Then we climbed back up to the cliffs to walk to the abbey. Great beach huts under the cliffs…

The Abbey was actually closed to visitors but we had a look around the graveyard by the church. We were much interested at the weird erosion on the gravestones.


My film photo above, Richard’s digi photo below

We managed to find various vantage points to see the Abbey over the wall – mine first…


think I stood on a bollard for this one


and Richard propped me half way up the wall for this one


and the wall was lower here so I could just see over it


Richard’s digi photo – not sure how he got it

Then we headed off down the 199 steep steps to the lovely old streets of downtown Whitby (lovely place) – the next four are Richard’s digi-photos…

After we’d called in at a nice caff and eaten, it was time to move on. Next stop – Robin Hood’s Bay. Richard had never seen this quaint little village but I’d visited several times when they used to have donkey beach rides. Also when I finished the Lyke Wake Walk (a 40 mile hike across the North York Moors to be done in a day)…

You park at the top of the hill outside the village after paying for yet another carpark. The one thing which really irked us on the East Coast was that you were expected to pay about £2.50 for parking at every single stop. As all tickets were issued by the council, I think you should be able to pay, say, £5 for the whole day and park where you like. We ended up paying £13.50 in 3 days and we’d managed to find 2 free parking places. Almost everywhere is double-yellow lines (no parking).

The first 3 photos are Richard’s, starting with the descent to the village…


Lovely pub we drank in later after our tea

I’d quite forgotten what a superb little village Robin Hood’s Bay is – all picturesque little alleyways, steps and cobbles and tiny yards – the place is a proper rabbit-warren of houses (my photos now – as it was quite dark now my light meter had given up and I was guessing the settings – I seem to have done okay!)

We explored the little streets and found quite a few dead-ends. I’m pretty sure we also trespassed along people’s frontages too but no-one came out and yelled at us! We then set off for a quick walk to ‘Boggle Hole’ along the cliffs before tea… These are all Richard’s photos as it was really too dark by now for my camera as I’ve never learned to do night photography on it.


Looking back at the village


Strangely striated beach!


Superb tunnel through the bushes


Boggle Hole – after the strenuous ups and downs, we found this a bit of a let-down to be honest

We then hurried back to Robin Hood’s Bay and found a pub to eat in. We ended up eating in ‘The Bay’ right above the beach – a superb meal and a great pub. I was delighted, as a vegetarian, to be offered a Yorkshire Pud filled with veggie sausages and veggie onion gravy with peas – not often I get a standard treat like that – I usually get over-fancy food! Richard had similar but with meat… When we came out it was dark and the moon was over the bay (Richard’s photo as I can’t do night photography!)

Another evening, we went to Staithes after visiting Sandsend. The parking was slightly cheaper here but the same principle as Robin Hood’s Bay – you park up top and walk down to the village and sea front… my photos again


Bunny warren cliff (my name) – I was horrified to see rabbits scampering all over this cliff on the grassy bits seemingly unaware that it was pretty vertical! 😮


The village is either side of the river


Dramatic Coastline

I then strolled along the harbour wall and suddenly noticed it was glinting in the sun. When I looked, each boulder was a large-crystalled granite of three colours, some black, some white and most honey-brown. The crystals were catching the sun and the whole harbour wall was twinkling beautifully. I tried to capture the effect with my camera but wasn’t particularly successful – you just had to be there and see it on a sunny day!

Richard soon joined me (he’d been to the pub) and was equally fascinated by the granite and also by the polar bear in the harbour! (I never noticed that – his photo)

Unfortunately, we now had to head back to our hotel for our final night – our trip was over – but we’d had a great time and pretty good weather!

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41 responses

11 08 2019
aliterarybent

It’s over 30 years since we were last in Robin Hood’s Bay and Scarboro’. We live in New Zealand now….scenic and beautiful, but lacks the history of the UK. I love those old villages, windy lanes and alleys. We’ll be back for a visit in 2020 so a trip to the east coast villages could be on the cards. Thanks for the post – very interesting and some nice photos.

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12 08 2019
mountaincoward

Can you take me back with you for a visit – I’ll try to fit in a suitcase. I’d love to visit NZ but not sure I’ll ever afford it as I’m just retiring – it looks such a gorgeous country!

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2 06 2019
underswansea

Looks like you had a great trip. I’ve said it before, wondering around such historic places must be a real treat. In this part of Canada if a building is 100 years old it is deemed ancient. Also liked all the photos. When you have your film developed do they also give you digital files or do you scan your own negs and prints?

Liked by 1 person

5 06 2019
mountaincoward

I just get negatives and prints from the developers. I scan all my prints in (well, the ones which are worth anything anyway). That makes my photo files and folders on my PC my most valuable asset as they represent literally years-worth of work doing the scanning etc.

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30 05 2019
tessapark1969

That looked nice. Never been to that part of the country – daft given the Dracula connections given I’ve been a goth!

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1 06 2019
mountaincoward

Whitby and Sandsend are both lovely and worth at least a full day for each. Robin Hood’s Bay is a lovely village, especially in an evening as it has 4 good pubs – at least 2 of which did really great food.

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29 05 2019
chrissiedixie

Lovely – that brings back so many memories! We do go fairly regularly even now though, too, although it’s been a couple of years since the last trip….

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1 06 2019
mountaincoward

I can’t see us going very often as I found it a pretty long drive – it was 3 hours each way across the country. But we liked it and will go again sometime

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27 05 2019
Simon Howlett

A wonderful adventure Carol, it’s a shame your brother refused to see you though. I love Whitby, it’s always nice to explore the town and I’ve sailed past that particular stretch of coastline a number of times. The doughnuts and Yorkshire Pud sound delicious!

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28 05 2019
mountaincoward

I don’t think you can beat doughnuts freshly made – totally different

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27 05 2019
Alli Templeton

Another great post, Carol. North Yorkshire does have some really gorgeous coastline, and it’s lovely to see it here with such fab photos to remind me of it. I went to Scarborough Castle last year and remember the stunning views from it’s high-up position. And I’ve also spent a good few afternoons wandering round Robin Hood’s Bay. When we were in Richmond, we got a parking disk which you could use in any car parks signed up to the scheme, and the disk was free. It might be a new move, because when we were in Northumberland they have the same scheme, where you buy a disk for a couple of quid and then use it in loads of car parks up there. Brilliant idea. Maybe North Yorkshire are just catching on to it.

Next time you’re in that area try Filey, just south of Scarborough. That’s gorgeous too, and we spent a blissful evening wandering along the seafront there. As for the strange erosion on the gravestones in Whitby, I remember when I visited the stunning abbey a few years ago that a lot its walls had the same type of waves and holes in the stone, and I thought then it was odd. But if it’s in the churchyard too, I wonder if it’s down to this particular stone they use (if it is the same) eroding in the same way, or if not maybe its a sign of a particular weather or climate pattern around that part of the coast. Very interesting though.
Nice to hear you had a good veggie sausage and gravy meal – I’m veggie too, so understand exactly what you mean when you say this type of fayre is rare. 🙂

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28 05 2019
mountaincoward

we used to go to Filey when we used to visit my brother (and when he used to consent to seeing us!)

Liked by 1 person

28 05 2019
Alli Templeton

Ah, so you know it then. We loved it when we went there, but it was a particularly beautiful and atmospheric evening. Sorry you couldn’t see your brother, though. Maybe next time.

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28 05 2019
mountaincoward

He pretty much said he never wanted to see any of us again (he’s paranoid schizophrenic)

Liked by 1 person

28 05 2019
Alli Templeton

Oh I’m so sorry to hear that. It must be hard for you and your family. I hope they can help him in some way to change that in the future. I know its tough though. At least you had a lovely few days in North Yorkshire, and judging by your posts it was more than worth it.

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28 05 2019
mountaincoward

he’s been like that since childhood and is in his mid 60s now so there’s no cure as such. It would help if he’d take his medication but, one of the problems with schizophrenics, is that they decide to stop taking it regularly. From there, they go into a downhill spiral until they can be persuaded to re-take their meds

Liked by 1 person

28 05 2019
Alli Templeton

Oh lord, that sounds like a particularly vicious circle. Sorry to hear that, it must be hard for your family.

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28 05 2019
mountaincoward

it upsets my mother – my father and I just accept it

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28 05 2019
Alli Templeton

I can understand that. It’s bound to affect your mum deeply. But we can’t control how our kids’ lives turn out. It’s good that you and your dad are more accepting of it though, that must help redress the balance.

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28 05 2019
mountaincoward

I’ve read up a lot on it and he’s pretty typical

Liked by 1 person

28 05 2019
Alli Templeton

It’s good that you’ve researched it because it helps you understand and accept it. Our 8 year old son is autistic, so we’ve researched that a fair bit too. I know autism is a different condition altogether, and everyone who has it is different too, but luckily he’s fine in many ways. So for us it’s been a learning curve.

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28 05 2019
mountaincoward

everyone slates Dr. Google but I think that, if you choose the right sites, from knowledgeable people, it’s really great

Liked by 1 person

28 05 2019
Alli Templeton

I agree – there’s a lot of good information out there. It’s just finding the right places.

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28 05 2019
mountaincoward

I find the best ones, apart from medical sites, are forums where people actually have that ailment!

Liked by 1 person

28 05 2019
Alli Templeton

Yes, we’ve found that. And the odd blog too! It’s always best to listen to people who either have the condition or live with someone with it.

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28 05 2019
mountaincoward

and I wish the GPs would realise that too!

Liked by 1 person

28 05 2019
Alli Templeton

Oh, don’t get me started on GPs. Total waste of time – hopeless. When it comes to Nathan, they’ve been as much use to us as a chocolate fireguard. You may as well ask the cat. 😉

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28 05 2019
mountaincoward

I think they’re too general – a little bit of knowledge about everything. They should probably refer to the specialists more

Liked by 1 person

29 05 2019
Alli Templeton

I agree, Carol. It’s a classic case of knowing a bit about everything but not enough to help.

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29 05 2019
mountaincoward

and not realising patients of long-term conditions often know more about the subject from their own experience

Liked by 1 person

29 05 2019
Alli Templeton

That’s absolutely true, Carol. They hate it when you know more than them, and I often find that works against the patient. It’s an ego thing I reckon.

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29 05 2019
mountaincoward

I’ve usually found my doctors listen when I tell them stuff – I even ‘agree’ my medication and dosing with them rather than just being told. I think they can see I’ve done quite a bit of research or experimentation myself before visiting them and, so far, they haven’t been averse to it

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29 05 2019
Alli Templeton

That’s good.Ours have always done the opposite, especially with Nathan. Perhaps you’ve got better GPs than us.

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29 05 2019
mountaincoward

maybe if you’re an adult, they just think “well, it’s your own funeral” and when it’s a child, they care more

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29 05 2019
Alli Templeton

That’s a good point.

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27 05 2019
John Bainbridge

An area we want to walk more.

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28 05 2019
mountaincoward

I found it more strenuous than hill-walking!

Liked by 1 person

26 05 2019
Blue Sky Scotland

Glad you are getting out and about again. Always fancied visiting those places as I’ve seen them featured in various films for years including a TV version of Dracula which was very atmospheric.with the cliffs and graveyards.

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28 05 2019
mountaincoward

Whitby is superb – especially up the hill at the Abbey – very atmospheric. I find the town very olde-worlde too which is lovely

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26 05 2019
Jim R

Thanks for taking me along on this trip. I looked up the towns on Google Maps. Here is a view at Sandsend. https://goo.gl/maps/ZubQdjUGwEbapyGe6
The tiny streets in the small towns require some good legs to go far.

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28 05 2019
mountaincoward

that’s really great – takes me back there. That was my favourite place of them all

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