Figueroa Mtn Freedom: Violating the COVID-19 Lockdown Order — Jack Elliott’s Santa Barbara Adventure

29 03 2020

Jack is spot on with this post! It’s far, far safer being spread out over wide areas in the mountains than it is cramming together on the lanes as I was today – never walked with so many people – and so closely!

A vernal pool on Figueroa Mountain. A male and female mallard were seen in the pool. March 27, 2020 I find it difficult to live in a society governed without reason. My mind operates logically. I am irascible by nature. I am not submissive. I am free thinking and independent. I do not subscribe to […]

https://yankeebarbareno.com/2020/03/28/figueroa-mtn-freedom-violating-the-covid-19-lock-down-order/


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11 responses

30 03 2020
Blue Sky Scotland

Above post is spot on for reasons why not to visit the great outdoors although I’m already getting bored with the 5 or 6 walks I do from my house every 3 days or so. If it stretches on for months I’ll get out the bike but with the crashes I’ve had on that over the years driving to a walk is 100 percent safer. Some of the restrictions have not been fine tuned or make much sense. Bike shops stay open according to news, Hardware shops stay open yet local builders yard is shut at the moment limiting supplies available for those who can safely work outdoors.

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30 03 2020
mountaincoward

Well I think the isolation of the hills is what we all need right now for social separation. It’s manic on the lanes now! I’ve never been so close to as many people as today – it was really scary.

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29 03 2020
bowlandclimber

Not so sure he “is spot on”
He has a very heavy political agenda.
I agree that you are unlikely to catch or pass on the virus in the wilds but by virtue of being in that wild country if you need help your are putting a lot of extra strain on the stretched emergency services. That applies to the UK just as well, the mountain rescue services have pointedly asked us to limit our adventures and I for one would not argue with their advice. As a climber and mountaineer I’ve always accepted risks and taken it upon myself to be self reliant wherever possible but now I don’t think those risks, however minimal are justified.
For most of us getting to the moutains involves driving a car ‘uneccesarily’ and an accident, as well as straining the emergency services, might put you in hospital which is the last place you want to be right now.
The mountains will be there when this is all over and you want to be alive to enjoy them.
If the streets or lanes from your home are crowded then choose another time of day for exercise, I’ve fished out my head torch for nocturnal ramblings.
Sorry this started off as a mild refute of his post and possibly your thinking and has ended up as a lecture.
Best wishes and take care.

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30 03 2020
mountaincoward

If I get this virus (which, walking around these local lanes around my house which are crowded with people makes it increasingly likely) the mountains will not be here for me another year – it will be a case of this being my last walking ever. I am thinking of walking at night but it’s a bit cold just now (my chest doesn’t really like cold much).

I’ve taken to going out on my bike which is far more dangerous than walking and much more likely to land me in hospital. I nearly fell off the other day on a tractor lane as I braked too hard on gravel – I’m just not a good cyclist. Of course none of us want to land in hospital at the moment as I agree it is really dangerous. But our grassy northern fells are almost impossible to have an accident on and I see that as a far safer way to exercise.

By the way, not sure if you knew but, if you have an accident on a field footpath, the mountain rescue are the ones who have to come and rescue you as the ambulance staff gave up anything away from the road quite a few years ago. After all the wet and then the sudden drying, it’s very easy to turn, and possibly sprain or break an ankle, on the stiff rutted ground just now in the fields. You’re also having to handle gates which is rough on the farmer.

I’m not having a rant at you either by the way – I’m just really frustrated at what I see as being unnecessary restrictions and the total boredom of doing exactly the same walks I’ve been doing all winter for the rest of this year (and it WILL be all this year – just like the foot and mouth was)…

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30 03 2020
bowlandclimber

I know exactly what you are saying – that the hills are perfect for social isolation but we all have to take our joint responsibilities seriously for now. Unfortunately, people do have accidents on “our grassy northern fells” – maybe not you or me!
I am precluding field footpaths also for the reasons you so rightly mention. Lanes and pavements only no matter how boring.
Cycling is still allowed for now but it has its dangers on our roads, more deaths than any other sporting activity. The Government may change its advice there – lots of other European countries have banned it already. Our Government haven’t made all the right choices at the right time.
We both fundamentally agree but I’m trying to avoid becoming frustrated, there are more serious things to worry about.
[I just didn’t like the tone of that American post you shared.]
Happy plodding.
Regards.

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31 03 2020
mountaincoward

Talking of lowland walking – Richard has just ended up in hospital after taking a bad fall in his woodland across the road from his house!

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1 04 2020
bowlandclimber

Oh dear.
So sorry to hear that, really bad luck.
Hope he is out of the hospital and making a recovery.
Take care.

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1 04 2020
mountaincoward

He’s back home. Actually would make a funny short story which I may, or may not, put out…

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1 04 2020
bowlandclimber

Good news.
…A story with a moral somewhere.

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2 04 2020
mountaincoward

Doesn’t have a moral – it’s just really funny (well we thought it was – others might not)

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2 04 2020
bowlandclimber

You are going to have to write it up.
Can I be the bad guy?

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