Highland Cross – It’s Now or Never (again)

21 05 2022

Wed 18 May 22

I’ve always fancied doing ‘The Highland Cross’ which is a challenge marathon right across Scotland at its narrowest point in a day (around 50 miles).  It runs between Beauly on the east coast and Morvich in Kintail in the west.  This is usually done as a duathlon (running and cycling) but, as I don’t/can’t run, I decided to do it as a walk and cycle.  The reason I decided to do it this year is that I’m not getting any younger – I’m 65 this summer so I thought it had better be now or never.  May is generally a good month for Scotland as it avoids midges/clegs and other biting things!

All photos:
Richard’s Olympus digi-camera which he kindly lent me

LOGISTICS

I thought long and hard this spring about the logistics and, originally, was going to do it in the usual direction which is west-east – this generally means the prevailing wind is behind you.  However, this meant dropping a bike off at the end of Glen Affric the night before and then taking my car back across the country to Kintail and having a night there.  It also meant that, after the walk and a night in Beauly, I could get the train with my bike back to Kyle of Lochalsh in Kintail but would then have to cycle 15 miles to Shiel Bridge/Morvich to pick up my car.

West to East also meant cycling at the end of the challenge – as I’m no cyclist and find it really hard, I decided that wasn’t a sensible option for me and that I should do the walk last – I can walk for miles no matter what state I’m in!

I had a rethink while out on a walk one day (I do all my in-depth thinking out on the hills)… I decided it would be better for me to do East to West – as mentioned above that would get the cycling out of the way first and I could finish with the easier (for me) walking.  It meant that I had to start with my bike after an overnight at Beauly, leave it at Glen Affric road-end, continue walking across to Morvich where I would have a night at Kintail Lodge near Shiel Bridge (an extra couple of miles walk).  From there I could get a Citylink bus in the morning to Kyle of Lochalsh and then have a leisurely 2.5 hour rail journey around the beautiful west coast back to Beauly.

Richard decided to come to Beauly and have 3 nights there and I decided to hire a bike from Cannich Campsite (see my recommendations page).  I love my small-wheeled foldup and had been doing 27 or so miles around the coast here on it and found it pretty comfortable and enjoyable and hadn’t found it tiring.  However, being a small-wheeled bike with only 3 gears, it’s obviously slower than a big mountain bike and time is an obvious constraint on a big challenge like this.

I was worried the mountain bike wouldn’t fit in my little Polo (still missing my superb Sunny) but, with the seats down and the passenger seat moved forward out of the way, it fit in without removing the front wheel – I had to tie the boot shut though (I’d brought baling twine as I suspected I’d have to).

The Cannich campsite folks kindly agreed to let me have the bike the night before for nothing and to pick it up from the Glen Affric roadend for a fee.  All in all, for a day’s hire and the pick up (saving me a further day’s hire and the petrol money for the 34 mile round trip to pick it up), it cost me £45 – pretty good I thought.

Part 1 – Beauly to Cannich campsite and cafe (17 miles)

I was up around 0800 (very early for me) aiming to set off at 0830 which I did.  Richard came out to see me off and insisted on taking this photo where I already look awful!  Good job he wasn’t at the other end with his camera!

OMG! What a sight!

I set off fairly slowly and cautiously through the rush-hour traffic for a mile to the Affric road junction – at this point I’d only had a little trial on the bike and I’m no longer used to having 24 or so gears!  Also, as this was a mountain bike and so had a high ground clearance, and as I have my seat very high as I’m tall and long-legged, I was very high up indeed and found it hard to actually get onto the bike and set off!

From the junction, you’re straight into a long hill up to a small hamlet/village.  I’d decided to only use the middle ratio and just use the 8 gears in that for simplicity and I was right down to first gear!  I am a truly awful cyclist though…

There was another not-too-bad hill after this and then Aigas hill which is a famous part of the challenge on your bike as it’s biggish.  However, it isn’t really steep but I did get off and walk up it as I see no point in knackering myself at the start of a challenge!

On the descent down the other side I found out how windy it really was – I had to pedal all the way down the other side instead of just speeding down free-wheeling… Damn!  I’d seen on the weather forecast that the wind would be against me and it was a very stiff wind!

There were a couple of sections open to the wind where I had to change down quite a bit and some more slight hills.  The thing annoying me most was the cars!  Since all the problems with the Highway Code changes and so many drivers getting done for ‘upsetting’ cyclists and getting unnecessary points on their licence – they simply refused to pass me until I waved them past.  This was annoying to me as I pull fairly hard on the handlebars in order to put the required amount of power on the pedals (I said I can’t cycle to save my life!).

Anyway, it had to happen… I had a shop van behind me on a narrower section (the road goes to less than a lane each way further down the glen).  I was going round one bend and there was another bend ahead… a car started to come around the bend the other way so, starting to feel like a traffic policeman from the old days, I signalled the shop van not to proceed.  Then when the car passed by, I signalled him to come past.  He thanked me by flashing his hazards… At this point, for some unknown reason, I lost concentration…

When I came to from my lapse, I was heading off the banked-up tarmac into the muddy wheel rut at the side – I knew what the end result of this was going to be on a large bike which I wasn’t used to and couldn’t easily touch the ground from… I braked a bit but was now heading for the grassy banking which was further downhill.  The next minute I gracefully went upside down with the bike next to me down the banking!

I struggled to get up but just couldn’t.  My legs wouldn’t work – they’d already had enough of the cycling and the pressure on my ‘bits’ meant my lower legs and feet had gone numb.  I was also trying to get up uphill anyway and, each time I put my hands down, I nettled myself!  In the end, I struggled to my feet with my hands covered in nettle-rash and made a serious mistake… I checked the bike (okay), checked myself (fine – it was a nice soft landing) but DIDN’T check my luggage!  At Cannich I found I’d lost my precious flask and it’s wonderful insulated holder – I’ve had both for years and am not sure I can replace either to the same quality 😦

I then realised that I was actually grateful for having fallen off.  My few minutes rest had allowed the circulation to start coming back to my feet and ankles, I felt slightly rested and my ‘bits’ didn’t hurt as much!  Still, I had to get back on and continue…

From here, it’s a pretty flat and sheltered ride through Struy to Cannich and I didn’t mind this section apart from my very sore bits (did I mention those?)  I arrived at 1040 and went into the cafe – as it was sunny I decided to sit outside and ordered a lovely pot of fruit tea.  I couldn’t face any food although I hadn’t had any breakfast apart from half an energy drink but decided to order a small piece of chocolate torte.  I had half an hour or so here and then went to let the bike hire guy know I was leaving for Glen Affric road end – I said I was going very badly indeed and that he’d best allow 3 hours instead of the previously suggested two!

Part 2 – Cannich campsite and cafe to Glen Affric road end (11 miles approx)

I was sorry to get back on the bike and head off into the brisk wind down the short couple of miles or so of flat to the Glen Affric turnoff… From here I was even more sorry as the road immediately sets off uphill and I knew it was a very long hill – I think it’s around 3 miles of solid ‘up’.  I cycled uphill for around a mile and then gave up and got off to walk the rest and was very glad I did.

The whole road is pretty up and down and is another 10 miles… There is a beautiful loch halfway along the road but it is very, very long.  I knew I had to get past the end of this loch before the last mile or so to the road end and I started to hate this loch with a vengeance!  Every time it came into view, the end of it was nowhere in sight.  I was by now cursing aloud and calling it all sorts of horrible names and saying I hated it!

By the last couple of miles, I was so completely knackered, each time I reached even a small rise, I had to get off the bike and walk up it!  Passing cars were looking at me and wondering what was up with the bike – they didn’t realise it was that something was up with me!  As the route into the carpark at the end is very slightly uphill, I even ended up walking into the carpark to very many puzzled stares – why was this strange woman taking a bike for a walk?

I was completely delighted to chain the bike up to a post by the toilets and have a break at a picnic table.  Here I ate my soft-boiled duck egg and had some more of my energy drink.  After around 10 minutes, I thought I’d best set off even though I was still knackered and even my legs felt tired.  I knew that my legs would walk no matter how bad they felt or how far they had to go – walking really is my forte.

From here I got the camera out – I couldn’t be bothered on the cycle to take any photos… So, it was about 28 miles down and about 23 to go…

Part 3 – Affric roadend to Morvich and then Kintail Lodge

I was stiff and achy to start but, by the time I’d passed all the walking tourists down the vehicle track to Affric Lodge, I found my legs were going okay and I was starting to feel better.  The vehicle track runs for around 3/4 mile and then you take to a lovely track which rises up above the loch (Loch Affric itself).  I’ve walked this a few times before and knew I liked it – it’s pretty good going and extremely scenic.  I clicked away happily with Richard’s camera…

Sgurr na Lapaich

Mullach nan Fraoch-Choire framed ahead

There are a couple of old shielings which I remembered from a return along the track from Mam Sodhail – I soon reached them and took a couple of photos…

There are really superb views from up at this height across the glen…

I was soon passing below An Tudair – my favourite Munro Top of Mam Sodhail…

After a few miles, the path re-descends to the floor of the glen.  I’d remembered an awkward crossing of one of the side rivers but found it had been bridged.

On reaching the glen floor, the track became tedious and I didn’t enjoy any of the next bit until the Youth Hostel at Alltbeithe – which is 8 miles from the Affric roadend and seemed more like 20!  There had been heavy rain over the last few nights and there were very many flooded bits of track which you had to circumnavigate in a cumbersome manner, climbing up and down the sides and having to jump bits – not what you want on a long challenge with already tired legs!  The track also goes up and down a lot and is harder and stonier for this section – neither of which suited me…

you have to get right past the end of the very long mountain in the far distance…

plenty of water!

Lovely falls under a bridge near the Youth Hostel

When I finally reached the Youth Hostel, I nipped in to the loo (which is left open) – here I heard a thump as something fell on the floor – it was my watch – the strap had finally broken after threatening to for a few weeks.  So I nearly lost my watch on this journey too – luckily it was a very loud thump!  I crammed the pieces back into my coat pocket – it was still working anyway…

I sat outside in the sun on one of the benches – there were a few folk about and I’d passed a few on the last section coming the other way – many were cyclists.  Here I finished my energy drink (so I’d by now had a coffee and a pint of energy drink that day – I didn’t feel thirsty at all though) and ate a cherry flapjack.  The cherry flapjack must be wonderful stuff as, when I set off again after 15 minutes or so, I was flying and felt completely fine!

Here I made another mistake.  I’d looked on the map and seen that the route through Glen Gniomaidh and the Bealach and Sgairne (a favourite of mine) was actually shorter than the normal route – it is a lot higher pass though… When I reached a bridge over the river where the paths split, I decided I’d go that way instead.  This turned out to be a mistake as, although the path was initially great, it soon disappeared into a huge area of peat hags which are very tiring to climb up and down out of.

As I wasn’t making good progress, I decided to cut across the high ground at the end of Beinn Fhada (the very long mountain I now had to pass) – this was obviously pathless, wet and nearly as tiring so wasted a lot of my flapjack energy…

I was pleased to reach the other, normal track which goes via Camban bothy and Glen Lichd – it had actually risen a long way up the side of Beinn Fhada so I met it sooner than expected and was glad not to lose a lot of the height I’d gained…

Looking at the map, I’d thought the normal track would be wet and ‘orrid as there were very many little burns shown coming down the side of Beinn Fhada and crossing the track – however, the path was actually really good!  It was initially a 2-sided rough vehicle-type track but, nearing Camban bothy, it narrowed to a single but good, firm track…

onwards – ever onwards – past the peak in the distance anyway…

Soon I reached an enclosure in the middle of nowhere so knew I must be nearing the bothy – bothies are generally old shepherd’s huts and the like…

Walled enclosure

and a ruin…

Camban Bothy

On reaching the bothy, I decided to have a look in – as you do… The door was bolted on the outside as well as latched.  I let myself in and was surprised to be greeted by a ‘hello’ from a man in the dark depths.  He was having a rest on one of the sleeping platforms – how come he was bolted in?!

I had a quick look around and then left, noting his wet shoes drying outside – mine were plenty wet by now but still comfortable (without socks of course)… I continued on taking a couple of photos looking back along my route…

The path now headed for a rise to a col – I hoped this was the start of the descent to Glen Lichd – no chance!  This kept happening – a series of false cols – each time you got to one, there would be a long swoop down, a long continuance on, another rise to another col… but still no descent to Glen Lichd.  The path was still very pleasant though and the scenery magnificent – I was looking at the back of the many North Glenshiel Munros I’d done over the years…

Ciste Dhubh (I fondly call it Beast Dhubh as it scared me when I did it)

the path continues on to another distant col…

Sgurr a’ Bhealaich Dheirg from the back

the back of Saileag, the Five Sisters behind… and the path continues on to another distant col…

nice little gill and falls

more of the 5 Sisters – and the path still continues on to another col…

After a last look back…

Bye bye Glen Affric (and Beast Dhubh)

We finally start the descent to Glen Lichd!  Here the track gets very interesting, scenic and enjoyable for a while…

the final col

going down…

stunning scenery!

nice balcony path…

looking back round the descent route – great fun!

My legs really enjoyed the steep descent and the stone pitching and I really enjoyed the scenery.  Even if you never do this challenge, you really should do the path from Glen Lichd up to Camban bothy…

I soon reached Glen Lichd House where I’d promised myself another drink (I was actually getting thirsty now).  When I reached it, there was a hose pipe gouting drinking water out from the burn – I filled my empty energy drink bottle and drank my fill making sure I took a full bottle with me.  I knew how long the walk out through the glen would be… or at least I thought I did – it ended up being another two hours!

the very, very long and tedious Glen Lichd!

Bye bye Glenlichd House and hello long route march!

I then put my camera away for the rest of the walk, put my head down and plodded determinedly on.  I know how bad I am at long, flat, hard tracks and knew I had around another 6 miles to go either on this track or on the tarmac road.  I wasn’t looking forward to it – I’d been dreading this bit all day actually.

The track went well down the main glen but then started to wind around.  It went on… and on… and on… I became thoroughly exasperated.  So much so that, when I met a poor nice lady walking her dog, I asked her a tad snappily ‘does this track go on forever or does it finish sometime?’  She was a very pleasant lady and stopped and chatted with me for a while.  When she heard where I’d come from she was fairly astonished and not surprised I was grumpy and tired I think.

She said the tarmac was just around the corner (which it was but no more enjoyable), she said she hoped I wasn’t carrying too much (I wasn’t as I always travel light) and offered to go back to her house to get me some chocolate!  We chatted about the Cuillin ridge on Skye and a few other mountain things and then we parted ways.

I trudged on round the corner to the tarmac.  Here there is a nice, soft little path alongside the river so I took that even though it was a little longer.  My legs really appreciated this and I was sorry to return to the tarmac eventually.

I had another couple of miles to go along the tarmac and, by now, even my legs had had enough and they’re tough!  I wasn’t looking forward to the mile or so along the main road…

When I neared the main road, there was a little tarmac path behind the roadside restaurant which cut a bit of main road walking out.  When I finally had to join the road, there was a wide grass verge which helped my legs a bit.  I was so tired by now that I didn’t bother walking around any of the roadside bushes but just crashed through them!  I was desperate to get to the hotel.  I was swigging away on my water and my throat was getting sore (my immune system starting to dip).

FINALLY… I reached the door of the hotel – I was barely able to open it!  I staggered in, ordered two Britvic oranges to be put into my water bottle at the bar, checked in and headed to my room.  I checked my watch – it was 2110 – I’d been just over twelve and a half hours – not too bad really… Don’t know how people do it in 5 or 6!

I’d e-mailed the hotel a few days before and asked if they could put some vegetarian food in my room as I pretty much knew I’d be late for evening meals and would miss out otherwise.  They’d really done me proud and put up a superb vegetarian ‘plate’.  It had a cheese and tomato sandwich in nice bread, hummous, black and green olives, parmesan slices, salad – it was truly wonderful.  The first thing I did on reaching my room and taking my shoes and gear off was sit and scoff it with the orange juice to wash it down.  My throat started to improve…

I then rang Richard, showered and then sprawled on the bed mindlessly staring at the TV (TV is a novelty for me anyway as I don’t have one).

I had a terrible night trying to sleep – I had the windows wide open and it was blowing a gale (and rattling the door – sorry neighbours) and throwing it down most of the night.  But my body was absolutely on fire!  I’ve recently been doing a sports nutrition course at work and it mentioned that after ‘endurance exercise’ you continue to burn calories for many hours after.  In this case, with it being extreme endurance exercise, I continued all night burning them!

Afterthoughts: NEVER A-BLOODY AGAIN! 

For some reason, I always thought the Highland Cross would be easy but it really wasn’t – at least not for me!  And I was pretty sure I’d got fit beforehand…

Stats: around 50 miles, 28ish cycling, 23ish walking, 12.5 hours, 2 litres or so of drink, 1 chocolate torte slice,1 boiled egg and a flapjack!

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28 responses

17 06 2022
Gaffr

Has just caught my eye…as we enter the season for Highland Cross. Not that am taking part but my daughter has announced that she is taking the place of a person who has had to pull out. The event started in circa 1982 when the cycling bit ended on Inveness. A year later and since Beulay has been the finish.
I Guess that starting from the East you miss out on the charge downhill on the bike ….a bit.of a rest after the grind up and over from Morvich.
It was, and I think still is, about getting sponsored money for the helping services.
I did it a few times in the eighties…an enjoyable day out meeting and chatting to folks while on foot and on the bike. Not forgetting the food on the village hall at the end supplied by the ladies of Beulay.

Liked by 1 person

17 06 2022
mountaincoward

Nice to hear from you!

I wanted to get my solo attempt sponsored but I didn’t have time really – it was reasonably last minute. Also I don’t work anywhere with a lot of folk nowadays – I used to be able to raise around £500 for challenges amongst the staff at work when I was in IT but, now I work in shops, I only have a few colleagues and not many others I could approach.

I’m glad the cycling wasn’t to or from Inverness for my attempt – it was the cycling which did me in! Hope your daughters attempt goes well 🙂

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4 06 2022
surfnslide

Impressive. I’ve read about this challenge although the one I know was from Loch Broom to Bonar Bridge. Not one for me though!

Liked by 1 person

4 06 2022
mountaincoward

Didn’t know about that route – I’m having a look at it now! I think it will be much tougher than the one I did.

Liked by 1 person

27 05 2022
underswansea

Great post! What a challenging endeavour to sign up for. Can’t figure out why the guy was bolted in the cabin, perhaps he lived under the floorboards and you surprised him. 🙂 Well done!

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28 05 2022
mountaincoward

Thanks! I’m still wondering who bolted the guy in and whether he asked them to (or whether he even knew he was bolted in). Needless to say, when I left, I didn’t re-bolt him in!

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27 06 2022
underswansea

How old is that rock ruin about midway down your post?

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27 06 2022
mountaincoward

hard to say as it depends whether it was a ‘shieling’ (shepherd’s house) or a sheepfold. If it was a shieling it’s probably been deserted since the Highland Clearances which were between about 1750 and 1850…

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25 05 2022
tessapark1969

Felt knackered just reading that – well done! You got some great photos.

I can’t cycle but with wild swimming it’s always getting the ‘undercarriage’ under water that’s the tricky bit!

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25 05 2022
mountaincoward

I’m starting to be pleased I did it now but it’s taken most of a week to recover – I was back on the hills yesterday but I still felt tired. My legs are fine now though – they were just a couple of days…

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24 05 2022
Alli Templeton

Well, Carol, that was a highly entertaining read, and a very impressive one! What an adventure! You never cease to amaze me with your escapades, and this one blew me away. That’s one hell of an undertaking for someone in their sixties, but you tackled it with your customary verve and determination, and you did it. What’s more, you even managed to take some wonderful photos on the way so we can all share the day with you. You more than earned your delicious veggie supper at the hotel, and Richard must be very proud of you. I am, and I salute you. Bloody well done! You’re an inspriation. 😀

Just one thing I have to ask: did you ever find out why that man was bolted into the bothy? 🙂

Liked by 1 person

24 05 2022
mountaincoward

Thanks Alli.

Nope, never found out why the man was bolted in – someone came into a bothy my friend was staying at once, took all his gear and then bolted him in so he couldn’t give chase! No-one else stayed at the bothy that night so he ended up having to climb out through a window the next day!

Richard definitely isn’t proud of me – he even said he thought I was ‘a silly billy’ for doing it! Furthermore, I asked him what he’d been up to on his day in the Beauly area while I was doing the challenge – he’d had a lazy day touring round on the train, went to Inverness and then came back for a stroll along the riverside and a massive ice cream from the shop! It’s obvious we see our similar ages in a completely different light!

Liked by 1 person

25 05 2022
Alli Templeton

Seems as though bothies can be a bit dicey to stay in. You’d think folk would be safe in them being stuck out in the middle of nowhere, but clearly not always.

Richard needs to stop acting his age at once, and take on some more adventures like you! Mind you, the ice cream sounds nice… 😉

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25 05 2022
mountaincoward

I tried to get an ice cream the next day but they were shut 😦 It was that soft, whirly ice cream too – my favourite! I often think men age mentally faster than women – funny as they mature slower at the other end of life!

Bothies are generally okay – there’s the odd incident but the more remote ones (like this) which have a decent length walk-in, are usually fine. Ones nearer the road get a lot of bad behaviour and undesirables though… Not sure why any bothy should have a bolt on the outside though!

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23 05 2022
Mark

It’s as a route as good as any in Scotland. Good write-up.

If you remember the first time we met was in Glen Afric. You were on your folding bike after a days Munro bagging. I’d been Munro Top bagging.

I’m currently doing the LEJOG bike ride. Done 563 miles so far and in Langwathby for the night. Over the border tomorrow.

Liked by 1 person

23 05 2022
mountaincoward

I remember our first meet-up very well indeed! Strange how we both knew who the other was but we did!

I see you’re still keeping super fit. I got to Langwathby a lot – I catch the train to Skipton from there when I’m on my monthly visit to my mother.

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22 05 2022
Natalie Minnis

That sounds gruelling! I couldn’t help laughing at your descriptions, but very impressive indeed. Hope your bits have recovered.

Liked by 1 person

22 05 2022
mountaincoward

they’re taking the longest but they’re getting better! I’m sure my own bike would have done less damage – it’s a more relaxed riding position anyway…

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22 05 2022
John Bainbridge

A grand stretch of country – and I admire your energy.

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22 05 2022
mountaincoward

I was wondering where my energy had gone after that cycle ride! And I certainly was by the end on reaching the hotel

Liked by 1 person

22 05 2022
bob

Well done Carol, What an adventure. Great photographs. Not something I’ve ever thought of doing…. or fancied doing- as even in my youthful prime I always tried to avoid multi day/ endurance events of any kind. Sloth is an underrated virtue!

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22 05 2022
mountaincoward

I’m really annoyed now as, back home reading my mountain rescue book by ‘Cairngorm John’ – he says he did it regularly and his times were 4.5 hours! I hate people fitter than me! 😐

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22 05 2022
jester1970

That was a punishing challenge. Well done for completing it. It’s always annoying to lose a bit of kit that you like, and often they “just don’t make them like that anymore”. I also used to have a small wheeled folder and they are a lot of effort. If you are in the market for a large wheel folding bike I can recommend the Montague range. Not cheap, but very good at what they do.

Liked by 1 person

22 05 2022
mountaincoward

I think it will be the ‘not cheap’ which would get me now I’m a shop worker and the cost of living has gone up so much. But my foldup isn’t any effort really – just slow with having small wheels and only the 3 gears. It’s definitely not a tiring bike to ride.

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22 05 2022
chrissiedixie

Briliant! Well done! It’s good to have a Challenge occasionally and even better if you succeed! Brought back memories of when I did the TGO Challenge 5 years ago – I started at Shiel Bridge and went up the Affric Kintail Way for a couple of days, in glorious weather.

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22 05 2022
mountaincoward

Actually, I was just discussing it with my neighbour – I couldn’t have given up even if I’d wanted to as I’d have been in the middle of nowhere so I had no choice but to continue to the end really…

Liked by 1 person

21 05 2022
Bitchy After 60

Now that was quite the adventure. More than I could ever accomplish. I can’t cycle period so I am impressed that you decided to do it. You must be proud of yourself for completing the journey. Wonderful photos.

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22 05 2022
mountaincoward

I’m proud now I’ve had chance to recover – I think at the hotel at the end, I didn’t care one way or the other!

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